Plenary Speakers

Dr. Ruay-Shiung Chang


Dr. Adrian Stoica


Dr. Tatsuya Akutsu


Prof. Tadashi Dohi





Ruay-Shiung Chang,
Professor, Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering,
National Dong Hwa University
The Internet: Past, Present and Future

Born in 1969, Internet has passed its 40th birthday. However, it does not seem to go into middle age crisis. Internet is still young and evolving. In this talk, we review how Internet goes to where it is now and outline the future research directions of Internet. Its impacts on society and human beings are also diagnosed.

About Dr. Ruay-Shiung Chang
Ruay-Shiung Chang received his B.S.E.E. degree from National Taiwan University in 1980 and his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from National Tsing Hua University in 1988. He is now a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Dong Hwa University. His research interests include Internet, wireless networks, RFID and grid computing. He has published more than 70 peer-reviewed journal papers and numerous international conference papers. He is an editor for International Journal of Internet Protocol Technology, Journal of Internet Technology, and Journal of Convergence Information Technology. Dr. Chang is a member of ACM, a senior member of IEEE, and a founding member of Taiwan Institute of Information and Computing Machinery. Dr. Chang also served on the advisory council for the Public Interest Registry (www.pir.org) from 2004/5 to 2007/4.
  


Dr. Adrian Stoica,
Senior Research Scientist, Principal MTS
Supervisor, Advanced Robotic Controls
Mobility and Robotic Systems, Autonomous Systems Division
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Security in the time of robots and cyborgs
In the context of robots becoming common to our daily life, and as we experience breakthrough advances in biology, this talk examines the migration from 'info' security to 'robo' security, and then further on to 'cyborg' security and 'bio' security. In a world of networked infrastructures the challenges of security have already grown well beyond conventional computer security. New challenges appear as computers enhanced by the addition of mobility and intervention capabilities (such as manipulation, fire power, etc) become robots of various types, from personal humanoid robots to unmanned aerial vehicles. A security failure in personal robots may lead to injury to individuals, damage/loss of property, etc, while at the other end of the spectrum, in military platforms it may lead to video intercepts as recently experienced by Predator drones, or worse, to platforms turning rogue and acting against their owners. Moreover, security challenges will further escalate as we transition from the time of robots to the time of cyborgs, as networked chip implants will become common in humans, and bio-artificial hybrids will gain superior abilities to the mechatronic robots of current design. Ultimately the greatest security challenge will come full cycle to protecting life, more specifically protecting access to the information of living organisms, at a future time when we will have reached the ability to understand, modify, and artificially create life mechanisms at intimate levels, and our greatest achievement would have also created our greatest vulnerability.
 About Dr. Adrian Stoica
Dr Adrian Stoica is a Senior Research Scientist and Manager of Advanced Robotic Controls at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. He has 24 years of R&D experience and project leadership. During the last 14 years at JPL he has introduced/pioneered new concepts/technologies in several domains, relevant for this talk being his contributions to security (survivable electronics, polymorphic electronics, cognitive anti-tamper techniques, shadow biometrics) and robotics (learning arm movements by imitation, robotic scaffolds for tissue engineering). He has been Principal Investigator in many multi-million dollar technology development and demonstration efforts funded by NASA, DARPA, USAF, OSD, etc. He has over 100 papers, 5 patents, a decade of keynotes and invited talks, has started 4 international conferences, all running, the oldest (NASA/ESA Conference on Adaptive Hardware and Systems) at its 11th anniversary. He has held Adjunct Professorship positions in Australia and UK, and has been member of numerous review and advisory boards for US, UK, EU, etc.

  
Dr. Tatsuya Akutsu,
Professor, Bioinformatics Center
Institute for Chemical Research
Kyoto University, Japan
Mathematical Models and Computational Methods for Analysis of Structures of Biological Networks

Extensive studies have been done on analysis of structures of various kinds of biological and social networks for these ten years. We have also been studying structures of biological networks with focusing on metabolic networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We proposed mathematical models for explaining scale-freeness and modularity of these networks.

For metabolic networks, we proposed a model based on mutation and short-cut. For protein-protein interaction networks, we proposed a model based on mutation and duplication of protein domains and random interaction of protein domains. We also developed computational methods for analysis of metabolic networks. For comparison of metabolic networks, we developed a method based on graph compression. For measuring the structural robustness of metabolic networks, we developed a method using integer linear programming. In this talk, we overview mathematical models and computational methods for analysis of biological networks with focusing on the above mentioned results and discuss future directions.

About Dr. Tatsuya Akutsu
Tatsuya Akutsu received B.Eng. and M.Eng. in Aeronautics and D.Eng. in Information Engineering from University of Tokyo, 1984, 1986 and 1989, respectively. From 1989 to 1994, he was with Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. From 1994 to 1996, he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Gunma University. From 1996 to 2001, he was an Associate Professor in Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo. Since 2001, he has been a Professor in Bioinformatics Center, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University. His research interests include bioinformatics, systems biology, and the design and analysis of algorithms.

  
  
Prof. Tadashi Dohi,
Department of Information Engineering,
Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Japan
Software Reliability Modeling in Past, Present and Future 

During the last four decades, the software reliability engineering has played a central role to provide several quantitative methods used in the real software development processes. Since the assessment of software reliability is one of the main issues in this area, we need several kinds of stochastic models to assess quantitatively the software reliability, which is the probability that the software system does not fail during a specified time period. In the software reliability research, a huge number of software reliability models (SRMs) have been proposed in the literature from the various points of view. In this talk, we overview the modeling framework to develop SRMs and their associated parameter estimation algorithms in two phases; testing phase and design phase. In the testing phase, not only the software fault data but also some related software metrics data are available, and can be utilized to describe the fault-detection phenomena. In the design phase, on the other hand, the software architecture is represented by means of Markovian analysis and is used to estimate the risk including some reliability measures from the information on both requirement and design documents. Especially, the latter approach receives much attetions by practitioners, because it enables us to estimate the software reliability before coding. We also mention several open problems in this research area.

About Prof. Tadashi Dohi
Tadashi Dohi received the B.Sc. (Engineering), M.Sc. (Engineering), and Ph.D. (Engineering) from Hiroshima University, Japan, in 1989, 1991, and 1995, respectively. In 1992, he joined the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hiroshima University, Japan, as an Assistant Professor. Now he is a Full Professor in the Department of Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Japan, since 2002. In 1992, and 2000, he was a Visiting Research Scholar at University of British Columbia, Canada, and Duke University, USA, respectively, on leave of absence from Hiroshima University. His research areas include software reliability engineering, dependable computing, and performance evaluation for
computer-based systems. He is a Regular Member of ORSJ, JSIAM, IEICE, REAJ, and IEEE (Computer Society and Reliability Society).

He published over 350 refereed papers and edited 12 books. Dr. Dohi served as the General Chair of several international conferences such AIWARM 2004, AIWARM 2006, AIWARM 2008, APARM 2010, WoSAR 2008, WoSAR 2010, and MANS 2010, and as the Program Committee Chair of RASOR 2005 and RASOR 2007. He will act as the General Chair of The 22rd International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering (ISSRE), Tokyo, Japan in 2011. He served in program committees for many other conferences including DSN, ISSRE, PRDC, ISAS, HASE, ICAS, MMR, and MIMAR. He served on the editorial board of Communications on Dependability and Quality Management in Engineering, Asia-Pacific Journal of Operational Research, Journal of Risk and Reliability, International Journal of Reliability and Quality Performance, International Journal of Quality, Statistics, and Reliability, Journal of Autonomic and Trusted Computing, IEICE Transactions on Fundamentals of Electronics, Communications and Computer Sciences (A), among others.


  

  
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